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External debt, savings, and growth in Latin America papers presented at a seminar sponsored by the International Monetary Fund and the Instituto Torcuato di Tella, held in Buenos Aires on October 13-16, 1986 by

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Published by The Fund, El Instituto in Washington, D.C, Buenos Aires .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Latin America

Subjects:

  • Debts, External -- Latin America -- Congresses.,
  • Saving and investment -- Latin America -- Congresses.,
  • Latin America -- Economic policy -- Congresses.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographies.

Statementedited by Ana María Martirena-Mantel.
ContributionsMartirena-Mantel, Ana María., International Monetary Fund., Instituto Torcuato Di Tella.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHJ8514.5 .E984 1987
The Physical Object
Paginationxv, 207 p. ;
Number of Pages207
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2391981M
ISBN 100939934957
LC Control Number87021422

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Edited by Ana María Martirena-Mantel, this volume, published in Spanish and English, contains the papers presented at a seminar sponsored jointly by the IMF and the Instituto Torcuato di Tella of Argentina. The seminar was held in Don Torcuato, near Buenos Aires. The volume consists of six papers, commentaries, and an overview by the editor, who also acted as moderator at the seminar.   Read "External Debt, Savings and Growth in Latin America: Papers Presented at a Seminar Sponsored by the International Monetary Fund and the Instituto Torcuato di Tella, held in Buenos Aires on October , " by available from Rakuten Kobo. Edited by Ana María Martirena-Mantel, this volume, pBrand: INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND.   Get this from a library! External debt, savings, and growth in Latin America: papers presented at a seminar sponsored by the International Monetary Fund and the Instituto Torcuato di Tella, held in Buenos Aires on October , [Ana María Martirena-Mantel; International Monetary Fund,; Instituto Torcuato Di Tella,;]. External Debt, Savings and Growth in Latin America: Papers Presented at a Seminar Sponsored by the International Monetary Fund and the Instituto Torcuato di .

  In any case, Latin America borrowed extensively. Debt statistics on an internationally comparable basis are available from about During the s, the external debt of Latin America rose from about US $25 billion to US $ billion or to a level probably 4-to-5 .   In Latin America as a whole, public debt as a percentage of GDP is still higher than at the end of and around 10 percentage points higher than in A rule of thumb suggests that debt levels in excess of 40 percent of GDP are unlikely to be sustainable over the medium term, leaving countries uncomfortably exposed to interest rate rises. Bagella M., Lo Cascio M. () Saving and External Debt in Latin-American Countries. In: Baldassarri M., Paganetto L., Phelps E.S. (eds) World Saving, Prosperity and Growth. Central Issues in Contemporary Economic Theory and Policy. Latin America. The debt crisis of the s is the most traumatic economic event in Latin America’s economic history. During the “lost decade” that it generated, the region’s1 per capita GDP fell from % to 98% of the world average, and from 34 to 26% of that of developed countries (Bértola and Ocampo, , Table ).

Gone are the days when Latin America was a tactical trade in a limited inventory of hard-currency sovereign bonds with enough liquidity for a speedy exit when growth faltered or inflation surged. Today, Latin America debt presents a complex opportunity set comprised of individual country stories that offer different risk-reward profiles. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.   The statistic shows the external debt in Latin America and the Caribbean from to In , the external debt of Latin America and the Caribbean amounted to . Latin America’s debt crisis and “lost decade” countries with endemically weak national savings rates found hard to meet. The Growth Trade Balance Transference Latin American countries to external financing led to rising fiscal deficits, which then.