Extract from a representation of the injustice and dangerous tendency of tolerating slavery
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Extract from a representation of the injustice and dangerous tendency of tolerating slavery

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Published by [s.n.] in London .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Microfilm. London, England : World Microfilms, 1978. On 1 microfilm reel with other titles ; 35 mm. (Anti-slavery collection, 18th-19th centuries ; reel 15).

Statementby Granville Sharp.
SeriesAnti-slavery collection, 18th-19th centuries ;, reel 15.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsMicrofilm 82/534 (H)
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Paginationp. 146-179.
Number of Pages179
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2981356M
LC Control Number84231845

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  A Representation Of The Injustice And Dangerous Tendency Of Tolerating Slavery, Or Of Admitting The Least Claim Of Private Property In The Persons Of Men, In England. In Four Parts.. [Sharp Granville ] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. This is a reproduction of a book published before This book may have occasional imperfections such as Get this from a library! A representation of the injustice and dangerous tendency of tolerating slavery. [Granville Sharp] A Representation of the Injustice and Dangerous Tendency of Tolerating Slavery; Or of Admitting the Least Claim of Private Property in the Persons of Men, in England. London: Printed for Benjamin White and Robert Horsfield, Octavo, full period-style red sheep, elaborately gilt decorated spine and boards, raised bands; pp. (ii), (1)   Buy A Representation of the Injustice and Dangerous Tendency of Tolerating Slavery (Cambridge Library Collection - Slavery and Abolition) by Sharp, Granville (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible  › History › Europe › Great Britain.

Buy A representation of the injustice and dangerous tendency of tolerating slavery, or of admitting the least claim of private property in the persons of men, in England: in four parts by Sharp, Granville (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on  › History › Americas.   An appendix to the Representation: (printed in the year ,) of the injustice and dangerous tendency of tolerating slavery, or of admitting the least claim of private property in the persons of men in England. By Granville Sharp. Author: Sharp, Granville, In A Representation of the Injustice and Dangerous Tendency of Tolerating Slavery () he contended that the very resort to ‘such obsolete customs’ as villeinage by the proponents of slavery revealed its absolute incompatibility with the ‘present constitution and customs of England’. 47 According to Sharp, even medieval contemporaries   The cultivation of the understanding which so greatly strengthens the selfish tendency of the English bourgeois, which has made selfishness his predominant trait and concentrated all his emotional power upon the single point of money-greed, is wanting in the working-man, whose passions are therefore strong and mighty as those of the

This work by the anti-slavery campaigner Granville Sharp (–) brings together legal and historical documents, as well as the author's own legal arguments, demonstrating that slavery was illegal and therefore could not be upheld in England. Furthering his own intellectual development while working for a linen draper, Sharp later became a government clerk and pursued a writing :// Get this from a library! A representation of the injustice and dangerous tendency of tolerating slavery: or of admitting the least claim of private property in the persons of men in Comprend: Extract from a representation of the injustice and dangerous tendency of tolerating slavery, or Admitting the least claim of private property in the persons of men in England:// Extract from a representation of the injustice and dangerous tendency of tolerating slavery. Extract of a letter wrote by the Earl of Essex, to his particular friend the